Assignments

English 1101 English Composition I, Fall 2022

Section 31: TR 11:00-12:15 p.m., Arts & Sciences 364

Section 26: TR 12:30-1:45 p.m., Arts & Sciences 364

In Class Activities

1. Summarizing and Reflecting

First divide into small groups of 4 or 5 and elect a secretary to record your disussion to share with the larger class. Then, your group will be assigned a text, either Anzaldúa or Nussbaum's article. Respond to the following issues:

  1. As Graff and Birkenstein recommend, put yourself in the author's shoes. Where is she coming from? What is her world view? What is she advocating. Feel free to use Graff and Birkstein's templates on page 42 to aide your summary.
  2. Next, select two or three passages that best represent the author's argument and/or experience, and explain them.
  3. Finally, where are you coming from with regard to the topic? What is your reaction to the argument? What is your experience of the issue? After reading and discussing the article, where are your thoughts headed regarding the topic?

2. Organizing the Personal Reflection Paper

You've brainstormed the personal reflection paper in informal writing. Today, let's get some feedback on your topic and how to organize. Divide into groups of two or three and respond to the following questions for each of group member's paper topic.

1. Is the topic sufficient for a 4-5 page essay?

2. What kinds of details or evidence do you expect to see in the writer's essay? What should the essay include and cover?

3. What are some effective ways that the reflection essay could be organized?

3. Summarizing and Objecting

Today, let's practice not only summarizing but also being skeptical of the text by breaking into small groups to discuss specific sections of Christine de Pizan's and Niccolò Machiavelli's arguments regarding monarchical rule. Groups will then share their thoughts with the rest of the class.

Here are the groups

  1. Christine de Pizan, 16. The Fifth Teaching of Prudence, which Is How the Wise Princess Will Try Her Best to Be in Favour with, and Have the Good Wishes of, All Classes of Her Subjects
  2. Christine de Pizan, 18. The Seventh Teaching Describes How the Wise Princess Will Keep a Careful Eye on Her Revenues and Finances and on the State of Her Court
  3. Christine de Pizan, How the Wise Princess Ought to Extend Largesse and Liberality
  4. Niccolò Machiavelli, Chapter XV Concerning Things for which Men, and Especially Princes, Are Praised or Blamed
  5. Niccolò Machiavelli, Chapter XVI Concerning Liberality and Meanness
  6. Niccolò Machiavelli, Chapter XVII Concerning Cruelty and Clemency, and Whether It Is Better to Be Loved than Feared
  7. Niccolò Machiavelli, Chapter XVIII Concerning the Way in Which Princess Should Keep Faith

Here are the questions:

 

1. Summarize the key claim in the chapter.

2. Select and explain the quotation that best illustrates the chapter's overall idea.

3. Discuss objections you might have to the author's ideas in general and the chapter in particular.

4. "My Dear Fellow Clergymen"

Today let's break into groups to work through King's and Tutu's ideas.

 

King groups should discuss the following questions:

Tutu groups should discuss the following questions:

5. Reviewing the Templates

In preparation for Paper 2 Summary and Evaluation, let's review and practice Gerald Graff and Cathy Birkenstein's They Say / I Say templates. Spend approximately 5-10 minutes applying your assigned template to your assigned article from today's reading. Note that your actual Paper 2 Summary and Evaluation will not incorporate all of these formulas, but you will find many of them helpful.

  1. "The Law Code of Manu" (Austin 380-4) and "They Say" (Graff 19-31): Start with what others are saying (in the upcoming Summary and Evaluation paper, this will be the author of the article.)
  2. "The Law Code of Manu" (Austin 380-4) and "Her Point Is" (Graff 32-46): Fairly summarize the essay's thesis, line of argument, and big idea(s).
  3. "The Law Code of Manu" (Austin 380-4) and "As He Himself Puts It" (Graff 47-56): Do not just summarize the essay, quote the essay to illustrate your understanding and create authority. (Next week, we'll discuss MLA style quoting.)
  4. "The Law Code of Manu" (Austin 380-4) and "Yes / No / Okay, But" (Graff 57-71): Respond to what in the text you agree with, what you don't agree with, and what you question.
  5. "The Law Code of Manu" (Austin 380-4) and "And Yet" (Graff 72-81): Distinguish your main idea from the essay's main idea.
  6. "The Law Code of Manu" (Austin 380-4) and "Skeptics May Object" (Graff 82-95): Articulate your objections to the idea.
  7. "The Law Code of Manu" (Austin 380-4) and "So What? Who Cares?" (Graff 96-106): Argue why the essay's ideas matter and/or don't matter.
  8. "The Law Code of Manu" (Austin 380-4) and "You Mean I Can Just Say It That Way?" (Graff 123-37): Translate the argument into your own, colloquial words.
  9. Epictetus, "To Those Who Fear Want" and "They Say" (Graff 19-31): Start with what others are saying (in the upcoming Summary and Evaluation paper, this will be the author of the article.)
  10. Epictetus, "To Those Who Fear Want" and "Her Point Is" (Graff 32-46): Fairly summarize the essay's thesis, line of argument, and big idea(s).
  11. Epictetus, "To Those Who Fear Want" and "As He Himself Puts It" (Graff 47-56): Do not just summarize the essay, quote the essay to illustrate your understanding and create authority. (Next week, we'll discuss MLA style quoting.)
  12. Epictetus, "To Those Who Fear Want" and "Yes / No / Okay, But" (Graff 57-71): Respond to what in the text you agree with, what you don't agree with, and what you question.
  13. Epictetus, "To Those Who Fear Want" and "And Yet" (Graff 72-81): Distinguish your main idea from the essay's main idea.
  14. Epictetus, "To Those Who Fear Want" and "Skeptics May Object" (Graff 82-95): Articulate your objections to the idea.
  15. Epictetus, "To Those Who Fear Want" and "So What? Who Cares?" (Graff 96-106): Argue why the essay's ideas matter and/or don't matter.
  16. Epictetus, "To Those Who Fear Want" and "You Mean I Can Just Say It That Way?" (Graff 123-37): Translate the argument into your own, colloquial words.

Informal Writing

1. Summary and Response

Choose either Anzaldúa or Nussbaum and write a page (double-spaced, 12pt Times New Roman font, 1" margins) quoting and summarizing the essay's thesis, argument, and main points. Then, write a page responding to the essay: How do the essay's ideas apply or not apply to your life? What is the function of language in your life, culture, and identity? What do you think the purpose of education is—economic development or democracy—and why? What connections can you make between the essay and your own life?

2. Brainstorming the Personal Reflection Paper

The first eight readings from Reading the World discuss education and human nature intellectually, emotionally, morally, and culturally. For the first formal paper, you will reflect upon an important issue in your life. For the second informal writing assignment, simply brainstorm topics and freewrite about them for two pages. What are some subjects that have personally affected you and how so? What important issue has transformed your intellectual, emotional, moral, or cultural world view? What has a significant experience in your life taught you about yourself, about human nature?

3. The Significance of Debates

Today, let's practice not only summarizing a debate and evaluating an argument but also exploring why the debate matters in an in class informal writing activity. Count off by one and two. Ones will respond to Madison's article while Twos will respond to Al-Hakim's.

If you have a laptop, you can write the response electronically and submit to GeorgiaVIEW > Course Work > Assignments > Informal Writing 3. If you don't have a computer, then you can write on paper and submit it at the end of class.

4. Reviewing the Main Ideas

In order to determine the topic for the summary and evaluation paper on an article from Reading the World, you will first browse all the articles we've read and select four to six you are interested in writing about. Then, spend one paragraph per article summarizing the main idea of the article and freewriting about why you agree or disagree with that idea; the four to six paragraphs should total approximately two pages.

Peer Response

Goals

The dual goals of this course are for you to critically read and analytically write about ideas in a variety of manners. Informal writing responses allow you to engage ideas and practice writing about concepts; and formal papers allow you to create well-structured and supported arguments about significant ideas. Peer response sessions extend the reading and writing process by allowing you and your peers to engage in direct oral and written dialogue about matters of composition and argumentation, with the ultimate goal of improving your formal papers. You have the opportunity to revise two formal papers based upon comments by your peers and professor. You will provide constructive criticism to two or three other members of the class as will they to you.

 

Note: If a group member does not submit her paper in docx or rtf format at least two days before the peer response session, the rest of the group is not responsible for responding to her paper.

Paper 2 Summary and Evaluation Peer Response Process

  1. Writers upload their papers to both GeorgiaVIEW > Course Work > Assignments > Paper 2 Summary and Evaluation and GeorgiaVIEW > Discussions > Paper 2 Peer Group # on Thursday, October 6.
  2. Each group member reads fellow group members papers, completes a peer response sheet for each paper, and submits the peer response sheets to GeorgiaVIEW > Discussions > Paper 2 Peer Group # by the start of the peer response class.
  3. We will not be holding regular class during the peer response sessions. You need only attend class during your group's scheduled date and time, see below.
  4. For the peer response session, either bring your laptop or bring paper print outs of the papers. per 2 Summary and Evaluation Group Times

Paper 2 Summary and Evaluation Peer Response Groups

11:00 a.m. Section

12:30 p.m. Section

Paper 1 Personal Reflection

We have been reading about education and human nature during the first month of class. In the first formal paper, reflect upon either your own adolescence and emerging adulthood or your experience-based understanding of human nature and then compose a five page paper that explores an issue that was and may still be crucial in your formative experience. Here are some questions that may help you brainstorm a topic (note that you may use an article in the book to help you write the paper but you are not required to use an article in the book to support your reflection):

Choose one issue that has deeply affected your identity and world view, either intellectually, emotionally, morally, or culturally; and then analyze how it functioned in your life. Your personal and self-analytical reflective narrative essay should break the issue down in order to reveal its complex operations. Your paper should have a controlling idea, be well-organized, provide specific details to support its analytical claims, and follow the rules of standard written English.

Paper 2 Summary and Evaluation

In the first paper, you analyzed a significant issue that affected your world view. In the second paper, you will fairly and accurately summarize a work and then evaluate it; you will both appreciate and interrogate it; you will articulate the text's idea and then provide your own perspective. If, upon evaluating and interrogating the essay's argument, you agree with it, you should extend it with your own evidence and points. If you disagree with it, you should refute it with your own counter-argument and counter-evidence. Use Gerald Graff's They Say/I Say templates to help you rhetorically frame what the text says as well as articulate your say. The following bullet points define what your paper should accomplish; they are not intended as an organizational guide.

Paper 3 Analysis and Argument

TBA

Paper 4 Research Project

TBA