Assignments

GC2Y 2000 Global Horror, Fall 2021

Sectopm 17: 2:00-3:40 p.m., Terrell Hall 405

Section 16 Honors: 4:00-5:40 p.m., Ennis Hall 201

Film Availability

This chart provides links to our class's required films that are available through links from JustWatch (a clearinghouse of film and television streaming sites), Kanopy (free streaming) GCSU Library (4 hour course reserves), and the Internet Archive (free download and streaming). Check Drew's Script-O-Rama and The Internet Movie Script Database for screenplays and transcripts to use as a a helpful reference for dialogue; however, if you write about the film, you should verify dialogue from the film itself.

 

Required Films Availability

Alien

JustWatch | GCSU

The Babadook

JustWatch | GCSU

Don't Torture a Duckling

JustWatch

Freaks

JustWatch | Archive | GCSU

Godzilla (1954)

JustWatch

Screening: Wednesday, September 22, 6:30-8:30 p.m., A&S 342

The Golem: How He Came into the World(1920)

JustWatch (includes Kanopy) | Archive | YouTube

The Haunted Castle

Archive

Häxan

JustWatch (includes Kanopy) | GCSU | YouTube

The Horror of Dracula

JustWatch

The Host

JustWatch (includes Kanopy)

The Infernal Cauldron

YouTube

Kwaidan

JustWatch | GCSU

Nang Nak

JustWatch

The Phantom Carriage

JustWatch | Archive | YouTube

Pulse (2001)

JustWatch

Screening: Wednesday, September 8, 6:30-8:30 p.m., A&S 342

[REC]

JustWatch

Screening: Monday, September 20, 6:00-8:00 p.m., A&S 342

Repulsion

JustWatch | GCSU

Shivers

JustWatch

Recommended Films

Availability

The Bird with the Crystal Plumage

JustWatch

Blood and Black Lace

JustWatch

The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari

JustWatch (includes Kanopy) | Archive | GCSU | YouTube

The Curse of Frankenstein

JustWatch

The Devil's Backbone

JustWatch | GCSU

Halloween (1978)

JustWatch | GCSU

Island of Lost Souls

 

Kuntilanak (2018)

JustWatch

Nosferatu

JustWatch (includes Kanopy) | Films on Demand | GCSU

Planet of the Vampires

JustWatch

Pulse (2006)

JustWatch

Quarantine

JustWatch

Revenge of the Pontianak

JustWatch

The Ring

JustWatch | GCSU

Ringu

JustWatch

Rosemary's Baby (1968)

JustWatch | GCSU

The Shout

JustWatch

Tarantula

JustWatch

The Tenant (1976)

JustWatch (includes Kanopy)

The Thing from Another World

JustWatch

White Zombie

JustWatch (includes Kanopy) | GCSU

In Class Activity

1. Atmosphere and Allegory

Robert Spadoni argues that narrative and atmosphere are tied together; and Christopher Sharrett discusses how influential horror film's allegorical critiques of ideologies, such as capitalism and patriarchy, are unraveled either by the films themselves or the horror genre more generally. Today, let's apply what we've learned from the atmosphere and social allegory articles to films we've viewed in our class. Individual students will count off, think about the questions that correspond to their number for approximately five minutes, and report their findings to the class.

  1. How does narrative contribute to the atmosphere of Alien? Talk about a scene that illustrates the tie between narrative and atmosphere.
  2. What social allegory does Alien present about capitalism and patriarchy? What elements of the film affirm the critique, what elements of the film unravel the critique?
  3. How does narrative contribute to the atmosphere of Godzilla? Talk about a scene that illustrates the tie between narrative and atmosphere.
  4. What social allegory does Godzilla present about science, technology, and Western power? What elements of the film affirm the critique, what elements of the film unravel the critique?
  5. How does narrative contribute to the atmosphere of [REC]? Talk about a scene that illustrates the tie between narrative and atmosphere.
  6. What social allegory does [REC] present about the Other and difference? What elements of the film affirm the critique, what elements of the film unravel the critique?
  7. How does narrative contribute to the atmosphere of Pulse? Talk about a scene that illustrates the tie between narrative and atmosphere.
  8. What social allegory does Pulse present about media and technology? What elements of the film affirm the critique, what elements of the film unravel the critique?
  9. How does narrative contribute to the atmosphere of The Horror of Dracula? Talk about a scene that illustrates the tie between narrative and atmosphere.
  10. What social allegory does The Horror of Dracula present about patriarchy? What elements of the film affirm the critique, what elements of the film unravel the critique?
  11. How does narrative contribute to the atmosphere of Freaks? Talk about a scene that illustrates the tie between narrative and atmosphere.
  12. What social allegory does Freaks present about normalcy, normativity, and otherness? What elements of the film affirm the critique, what elements of the film unravel the critique?
  13. How does narrative contribute to the atmosphere of Häxan? Talk about a scene that illustrates the tie between narrative and atmosphere.
  14. What social allegory does Häxan present about patriarchy? What elements of the film affirm the critique, what elements of the film unravel the critique?

2. Horror's Otherness

Today, let's apply Adam Lowenstein's understanding of James Clifford's and Robin Wood's theories of otherness in horror films to films we've already discussed in class. As a class, answer the following questions:

Individual, think through the following assigned question for five minutes and report your findings to the class.

Presentation Schedule

First week of class: Sign up for two slots, one in the first half of the semester and another in the second half of the semester: one Article Summary (AS) and one Film Response (FR).

 

Third week of class: Sign up for one slot: Learning Beyond the Classroom Project (LB), but not in the same week as an Article Summary (AS) or Film Response (FR).

 

Written

Due Date

Oral

Due Date

Assignment

2:00 Student

4:00 Student

S, 8-21

M, 8-23

Picart

AS

AS

Häxan

FR

FR Taylor Bash

M, 8-23

W, 8-25

Telotte

AS Harper Wall

AS

The Golem

FR

FR Jacqui Banks

S, 8-28

M, 8-30

Benshoff or Petley

AS Callie Miller

AS

Freaks

FR

FR Ellie Archer

M, 8-30

W, 9-1

Worland or Hudson

AS Meadow Etheridge

AS Anna Durden

The Horror of Dracula

FR Stella Boston

FR Abbie Reynolds

M, 9-6 W, 9-8

Balmain

AS Shelby Cannon

AS Jack Howle

Kwaidan: The Black Hair

FR Kimmie Galka

FR Isabella Oetting

Kwaidan: The Woman/Snow

FR Brooke Mooney

FR Estefania Esmerio-Rivera

Kwaidan: Hoichi the Earless

FR Sierra Hart

FR Caroline Hegwood

Kwaidan: In a Cup of Tea

FR William Bartlett

FR Lizzy Niswonger

S, 9-11

M, 9-13

McRoy

AS Anna Case

AS Marta Knapp

Pulse (2001)

FR Ashley Thomann

FR Julia Bedell

FR Avery Hobbs

M, 9-20

W, 9-22

Olney

AS Meredith Robertson

AS Aiden Gardner

Kee

AS Dylan Shelnutt

[REC]

FR Emma Rooks

FR Jenesis Harris

FR Ava Thomas

S, 9-25

M, 9-27

Hantke

AS Gracie Britt

AS Alyssa Wright

Godzilla (1954)

FR Susie Hightower

FR Marta Knapp

FR Harper Wall

S, 10-2

M, 10-4

Hart

AS Avery Hobbs

AS Julia Bedell (Dumas)

Dumas

AS Samuel Johnson (Hart)

M, 10-4

W, 10-6

Creed

AS Brooke Mooney

AS Jacqui Banks

Alien

FR Emilia Lajewski

FR Jack Howle

FR Zecheriah O'dell

FR Caroline Johnson

M, 10-11

W, 10-13

Sharrett or Spadoni

AS Kenzie Youngclaus (Sharrett)

AS Allie Cole

AS Susie Hightower (Spadoni)

S, 10-16

M, 10-18

Humphrey

AS Stella Boston

AS Abbie Reynolds

Freeland

AS Samantha Meeks

AS Taylor Bash

M, 10-18

W, 10-20

Repulsion

FR Anna Case

FR Alyssa Wright

FR Gracie Britt

FR Aiden Gardner

S, 10-23

M, 10-25

Hill or Reyes

AS Emma Talley

AS Lizzy Niswonger

M, 10-25

W, 10-27

Shivers

FR Samantha Meeks

FR Haley James

FR Callie Miller

LBTC Group 1

2:00 The Platform

4:00 Funny Games

LB Meadow Etheridge

LB Anna Durden

LB Brooke Mooney

LB Caroline Hedgwood

LB Ashley Thomann

LB Jack Howle

LB Harper Wall

LB Haley James

LBTC Group 2

4:00 Train to Busan

XXX

LB Taylor Bash

XXX

LB Jenesis Harris

XXX

LB Amber Hutcheson

S, 10-30

M, 11-1

Sutton

AS Zechariah O'dell

AS Jenesis Harris

King

AS Ashley Thomann

The Babadook

FR Stella Boston

FR Anna Durden

FR Meadow Etheridge

FR Emma Talley

M, 11-1

W, 11-3

Heffernan or Hunter

AS Matt Hamaty

AS Isabella Oetting

LBTC Group 3

2:00 Train to Busan

4:00 The Platform

LB Kimmie Galka

LB Estefania Esmerio

LB Kenzie Youngclaus

LB Caroline Johnson

XXX

LB Lizzy Niswonger

XXX

LB Isabella Oetting

LBTC Group 4

2:00 Veronica

LB

XXX

LB Bella DeSalvo

XXX

LB Callie Miller

XXX

S, 11-6

M, 11-8

Kendrick

AS Emma Rooks

AS Ellie Archer

Clover

AS Emilia Lajewski

M, 11-8

W, 11-10

Don't Torture a Duckling

FR Meredith Robertson

FR Allie Cole

LBTC Group 5

2:00 Parasite

4:00 The Ritual

LB Paul Bartlett

LB Aiden Gardner

LB Stella Boston

LB Samuel Johnson

LB Gracie Britt

LB Alyssa Wright

LBTC Group 6

2:00 The Conjuring 2

4:00 Lilie

LB Sierra Hart

LB Ellie Archer

LB Susie Hightower

LB Jacqui Banks

LB Zechariah O'dell

LB Marta Knapp

M, 11-15

W, 11-17

Martin or Alaimo

AS Sierra Hart

AS Estefania Esmerio-Rivera

The Host

FR Bella DeSalvo

FR Amber Hutcheson

Dylan Shelnutt

LBTC Group 7

2:00 Veronica (2017)

4:00 Midnight Mommy (2014)

LB Meredith Robertson

LB Julia Bedell

LB Emma Rooks

LB Allie Cole

LB Emma Talley

LB Abbie Reynolds

LBTC

The Ritual (2017)

The Devil's Backbone (2001)

LB Samantha Meeks (individual)

XXX

LB Anna Case (with Dylan, Ava)

XXX

LB Dylan Shelnutt (with Anna, Ava)

XXX

LB Ava Thomas (with Anna, Dylan)

XXX

S, 11-27 M, 11-29

Coleman

AS Ava Thomas

As Haley James

S, 11-27

M, 11-29

Lowenstein

AS Bella DeSalvo

AS Caroline Hegwood

M, 11-29

W, 12-1

Ng

AS William Bartlett

AS Amber Hutcheson

Nang Nak

FR Kenzie Youngclaus

FR Samuel Johnson

FR Matt Hamaty

Article Summary

Written Summary

You will write an article summary and post it to GeorgiaVIEW > Course Work > Assignments > Article Summary two days before we are scheduled to discuss the article so I have time to read your response before class. The article summary should

Informal Presentation

You will also be responsible for a brief, informal presentation. The presentation should introduce the essay by defining key points and terms (without simply reading your written summary) and broaching issues for class discussion.

Due Dates

  1. Your written assignment will be due in GeorgiaVIEW > Course Work > Assignments > Article Summary two days before we are scheduled to discuss an article. Summaries will be penalized one letter grade for each day, not class period, that they are turned in late. It is your responsibility to check the sign up schedule and complete the assignment on time.
  2. Your brief, informal presentation will be due on the day we discuss the essay in class. This date is approximate for we will sometimes fall a day behind. Failing to present the article to the class without providing a valid absence excuse will result in a two letter grade penalty.
  3. I will return your graded assignment to you in GeorgiaVIEW > Course Work > Assignments > Article Summary approximately one week after we discuss the article in class. Due to GeorgiaVIEW limitations, I am unable to return graded assignments to you unless and until you submit them to the Assignment dropbox.
  4. For example, we are scheduled to discuss Picart's "The Documentary Impulse and Reel/Real Horror" on Monday, August 23. Therefore, someone's summary will be due in GeorgiaVIEW on Saturday, August 21. In class on Monday, August 23, that student will informally present the main ideas of Picart's essay. I will return the graded article summary to that student the following week in GeorgiaVIEW > Course Work > Assignments > Article Summary. Here's how to calculate your course grade.

Sign Up

The article summary, film response, and learning beyond the classroom project schedules are here.

Film Response

Written Summary

You will respond to a film and post it to GeorgiaVIEW > Course Work > Assignments > Film Response two days before we are scheduled to discuss the film so I have time to read your response before class. The film response should

Informal Presentation

You will also be responsible for a brief, informal presentation. The presentation should discuss the highlights of your response (without simply reading your written summary) and broach issues for class discussion.

Due Dates

  1. Your written assignment will be due in GeorgiaVIEW > Course Work > Assignments > Film Response two days before we are scheduled to discuss the film. Responses will be penalized one letter grade for each day, not class period, that they are turned in late. It is your responsibility to check the sign up schedule and complete the assignment on time.
  2. Your brief, informal presentation will be due on the day we discuss the film in class. This date is approximate for we will sometimes fall a day behind. Failing to present the response to the class without providing a valid absence excuse will result in a two letter grade penalty.
  3. I will return your graded assignment to you in GeorgiaVIEW > Course Work > Assignments > Film Response approximately one week after we discuss the article in class. Due to GeorgiaVIEW limitations, I am unable to return graded assignments to you unless and until you submit them to the Assignment dropbox.
  4. For example, we are scheduled to discuss Haxan on Monday, August 23. Therefore, someone's film response will be due in GeorgiaVIEW on Saturday, August 21. In class on Monday, August 23, that student will informally present the main points of their response. I will return the graded film response to the student the following week in GeorgiaVIEW > Course Work > Assignments > Film Response. Here's how to calculate your course grade.

Sign Up

The article summary, film response, and learning beyond the classroom project sign up and presentation schedules are here.

Comparison/Contrast Essay

We have looked at a number of early horrors films (The Phantom Carriage, Haxan, The Golem, Freaks, The Horror of Dracula, Kwaidan) with a variety of horrors (death, witches, freaks, vampires, ghosts) from a variety of countries (Sweden, Denmark, Germany, United States, United Kingdom, Japan). For the first formal paper, you will compare and contrast how horror functions in two films. You have two choices of approach.

Your paper must use textual evidence from the films such as but not limited to dialogue, title cards, shots, soundtrack, camera angles, and editing. Option A must also cite the text of one or more in class articles. Before you draft the paper, you will submit a thesis statement and outline, which will be reviewed by your peers. The mandatory first draft of your paper will be reviewed by your peers and graded by your professor. The optional second draft grade will replace the first draft grade.

Parameters

Peer Response

Goals

The two main goals of our class is for you to learn multiple intellectual approaches to horror films and to develop a global perspective regarding the culture of horror films, and the course approaches these outcomes through analytical and research writing. Peer response sessions extend the writing process by allowing you and your peers to engage in direct oral and written dialogue about matters of analysis and research, with the ultimate goal of improving your formal papers. You have the opportunity to revise your Comparison/Contrast Essay and your Research Paper based upon comments by your peers and professor. You will provide constructive criticism to other members of the class as will they to you. Here are the peer response templates for the Comparison/Contrast Essay and the Research Paper.

 

Note: If a group member does not submit her paper to the GeorgiaVIEW discussion board in a format your computer can read, such as Word, at least two days before the peer response session, the rest of the group is not responsible for responding to her paper. If a group member fails to attend the group response session, the member's paper will not receive feedback.

Comparison/Contrast Peer Response

Here is the peer response process for the Comparison/Contrast Essay:

  1. On Monday, September 20, writers upload their papers to both
    • GeorgiaVIEW > Discussions > Comparison/Contrast Peer Response > Group #
    • GeorgiaVIEW > Course Work > Assignments > Comparison/Contrast Essay Draft 1
  2. Read, take notes on, and prepare to respond to your group members' papers before the peer response time.
  3. GCSU/USG policy prohibits treating students differently based on wearing masks and being vaccinated, and it also prohibits social distancing. Since the majority of the class has anonymous shared that they are uncomfortable working in small groups in person under these risky conditions, and since professors are prohibited from working with students in hybrid format unless those students are quarantining or isolating, and since I promised you I would not force anyone to take a health risk that made them uncomfortable, peer response groups will meet at a location of their choosing to conduct the review workshop. Groups must tell the professor where they plan to meet by Monday, September 27; students who feel uncomfortable with the location should contact the professor. Groups are encouraged to call the professor (478.445.0964) for guidance and feedback during the peer response session at the listed times. Your peer response group will elect a secretary to record the group's collective response to the Comparison/Contrast peer response sheet for each writer. Your group will spend about 15-20 minutes reviewing each paper, providing feedback on Style and Gramma, Thesis and Controlling Idea, Comparison and Contrast, and Organization. If groups have time, you can also response to Voice, Successes and Weaknesses, and Quality and Creativity. The secretary will upload the completed sheets for each paper to GeorgiaVIEW > Discussions > Comparison/Contrast Essay > Group #.
  4. After your paper is reviewed by your peer response group, and before the end of class, submit a bullet point list of 3-5 things about your paper that you plan to revise, based upon your peers' feedback. Submit to your peer group's GeorgiaVIEW discussion board. Failure to submit will result in a one-third letter grade deduction off the final paper.
  5. If you miss the peer response session or do not read your peers' papers before the peer response session, you must complete a peer response sheet for each of your fellow group members. Failure to do so will result a one-third letter grade deduction for the final paper grade.

Wednesday, September 29, 2:00-3:40 p.m.

Wednesday, September 29, 4:00-5:40 p.m.

Research Essay Peer Response

Here is the peer response process for the Research Essay:

  1. On Monday, November 15, writers upload their papers to both
    • GeorgiaVIEW > Discussions > Research Essay Peer Response > Group #
    • GeorgiaVIEW > Course Work > Assignments > Research Essay Draft 1
  2. Read, take notes on, and prepare to respond to your group members' papers before the peer response time.
  3. GCSU/USG policy prohibits treating students differently based on wearing masks and being vaccinated, and it also prohibits social distancing. Since the majority of the class has anonymous shared that they are uncomfortable working in small groups in person under these risky conditions, and since professors are prohibited from working with students in hybrid format unless those students are quarantining or isolating, and since I promised you I would not force anyone to take a health risk that made them uncomfortable, peer response groups will meet at a location of their choosing to conduct the review workshop. Groups must tell the professor where they plan to meet by Wednesday, November 17; students who feel uncomfortable with the location should contact the professor. Groups are encouraged to call the professor (478.445.0964) for guidance and feedback during the peer response session at the listed times. Your peer response group will elect a secretary to record the group's collective response to the Research Essay peer response sheet for each writer. Your group will spend about 15-20 minutes reviewing each paper, providing feedback on Style and Gramma, Thesis and Controlling Idea, Film Analysis and Evidence, Research, and Organization. If groups have time, you can also response to Voice, Successes and Weaknesses, and Quality and Creativity. The secretary will upload the completed sheets for each paper to GeorgiaVIEW > Discussions > Research Essay > Group #.
  4. After your paper is reviewed by your peer response group, and before the end of class, submit a bullet point list of 3-5 things about your paper that you plan to revise, based upon your peers' feedback. Submit to your peer group's GeorgiaVIEW discussion board. Failure to submit will result in a one-third letter grade deduction off the final paper.
  5. If you miss the peer response session or do not read your peers' papers before the peer response session, you must complete a peer response sheet for each of your fellow group members. Failure to do so will result a one-third letter grade deduction for the final paper grade.

Monday, November 22, 2:00-3:40 p.m.

Monday, November 22, 4:00-5:40 p.m.

Learning Beyond the Classroom Project

The article summary compels you to read actively and to abstract informally the key ideas from an article. The film response compels you to view actively and to respond informally to significant scenes and meanings of a film. The comparison/contrast essay requires formal, drafted, reviewed, and revised analysis of film. The learning beyond the classroom project allows you to work in small groups to apply your understanding of film in creative or critical ways beyond conventional essays. You will record your project outside of class, and we will discuss your project inside of class.

 

Film Option (Creative): Create a 3-5 minute horror film that applies the style and/or themes of two films studied in class. Along with the film, submit a two page explanation of how your film emulates the styles and mimics the issues of the in-class films.

 

Podcast Option (Critical): Record a 20-30 minute podcast episode that discusses a non-American horror film not studied in class, subject to professor approval. Be sure to address such issues as film style, film elements (shots, scene, camera, lighting, etc.), conflict, character, and theme.

Parameters

Sign Up

The article summary, film response, and learning beyond the classroom project schedules are here.

Research Essay

While the first formal essay required you to compare and contrast the portrayal and themes of two films, the second formal essay involves both your own film interpretation and the integration of scholarly horror film criticism. You will research, analyze, and interpret a horror film or horror film issue in a formal, peer reviewed, and revised essay that incorporates sources from an accompanying annotated bibliography. Your interpretation of a horror film should make an overarching claim about the film or film issue, employ film analysis to prove its interpretation, and use scholarly research to support its analysis and ideas. Alternatively, you could explore an issue relevant to many horror films, analyzing a number of exemplary horror films and integrating relevant secondary sources to support the discussion. For example, you could write about the psyche of the killer in Lucio Fulci's Don't Torture a Duckling with the aide of secondary sources on Fulci films or you could write about the portrayal of gender and sexuality in gialli and use films by Dario Argento, Mario Bava, and Lucio Fulci with the aide of secondary sources on the giallo genre.

 

If you interpret a film, the film should be researchable, that is, you should be able to find sufficient scholarly sources that analyze the film. Because peer review of books and journals takes a couple of years, this precludes films released in the last five years and mandates the research of films that inspire scholarly criticism. You cannot research films that you wrote about in your comparison/contrast essay.

 

Your research should be scholarly, that is, you should find scholarly, peer reviewed journal articles, book chapters, and books using the university library's databases rather than Googling periodicals and blogs. 2:00 section students should find 15 scholarly sources to determine if your film or issue is researchable. Then, you should annotate 8 sources to determine which are the most helpful for your project. Finally, you should integrate 4 sources that help you analyze the film/issue into your 7-9 page research paper. 4:00 section students should find 15 scholarly sources, annotate 10 sources, and integrate 5 sources into the 8-10 page research paper.

Research Proposal and Source List

While the comparison/contrast essay required you to submit a thesis statement and outline, the research project necessitates that you submit a research proposal that includes both

  1. a paragraph that formulates your research question, issue, or idea, and
  2. a list of 10-15 potential sources
    • The working bibliography should be styled in MLA Format and compiled using the Literary Research Methods page.
    • Approximately half of the sources should be scholarly books from the GCSU and USG libraries and approximately half should be scholarly journal articles from databases like Academic Search Complete.
    • While other professors might consider encyclopedias, newspapers, magazines, and website study guides to be appropriate for college level research, I deem academic books and peer reviewed journal articles the only appropriate sources for scholarly research. Therefore, you should not submit primary texts (i.e., films), encyclopedia entries, magazine articles, newspaper articles, book reviews, websites, study guides like Sparknotes and MasterPlots, or student paper mills. While you may use reputable periodicals and websites to help support the claims and analysis in your research essay, they do no not count as scholarly sources.

As good writing habit, you are encouraged to write a thesis statement and outline before drafting your paper, but you are not required to submit them for this paper. Keep in mind that you may conference with your professor at any time for direction on your project.

Annotated Bibliography

Two weeks before drafting your paper, you will submit a draft of your annotated bibliography, i.e., the research that you will use to prepare for the paper. An annotated bibliography is an MLA styled works cited list of scholarly books, book chapters, and peer-reviewed journal articles that provides a 75-100 word summary of each secondary source's argument as well as how the secondary source interprets and illuminates the meaning of the primary text, i.e., the film. Do not simply summarize the topic, provide the article's overall thesis or the article's main idea as it relates to your research question. I recommend answering the following questions:

  1. What question, issue, or topic is the source investigating?
  2. What is the source's thesis or conclusion regarding the film or film issue?
  3. How does the source help your understanding of the film or film issue?

2:00 section students should annotate 8 sources that could be used in the research paper; 4:00 section students should annotated 10 sources.

 

In terms of formatting, I using this template.

Research Essay Draft 1

Your well-organized, thesis-driven research essay should analyze film(s) using evidence from film and be supported by evidence from research sources. 2:00 section students should compose a 7-9 page essay incorporating at least 4 research sources; 4:00 section students should compose an 8-10 page essay incorporating at least 5 research sources.

Optional Paper and Annotated Bibliography Revision

Your paper will be reviewed by your peers; your paper and annotated bibliography will receive feedback and a tentative grade from your professor. You may revise your paper and annotated bibliography. If you choose to revise, you must include a revision statement (a paragraph or bullet points noting what issues you worked on in your second draft) and highlight major changes in your essay and bibliography.

Parameters

Essay Exam

On Wednesday, November 10, both class sections opted for a take home exam. The two question essay exam will be distributed on Wednesday, December 1 and will test your knowledge and understanding of films covered on the syllabus since October, film theory covered on the syllabus since October, and film elements covered on the syllabus throughout the semester. The exam will be due on Tuesday, December 7 for students in the 2:00 section and Wednesday, December 8 for students in the 4:00 section.

Essay 1 Gender

Incorporating ideas and quotations from four different authors' articles we've read since October 4as well as three types of film evidence from three different horror films we've watched since October 4, write an essay that examines the representation of gender in horror films around the world. Your 4-5 page essay should be thesis-driven, well-organized, and formatted in MLA style.

Essay 2 Cultural Anxieties and Fears

Incorporating ideas and quotations from four different authors' articles we've read since October 4 as well as three different types of film evidence from three different horror films we've watched since October 4, write an essay that explores the cultural anxieties and fears in horror films across the world. Your 4-5 page essay should be thesis-driven, well-organized, and formatted in MLA style.

Film Articles

Each essay must quote from four different articles, for a total of eight different articles over the course of the two essay exam. Film articles include:

Film Elements

Each essay must discuss three different film elements, for a total of six different film elements over the course of the two essay exam. Film elements include:

Films

Each essay must analyze three different films, for a total of six different films over the course of the two essay exam. Films include:

Parameters